Email Site Author Mark Schumacher Sign Up for Our Free Newsletter on Buddhist Statuary spacer
Follow on Social Media
My Wordpress Buddha Statues Blog Follow Me on Facebook Follow Me on Twitter Follow Me on Google + Follow Me on LinkedIn Follow Me on Youtube Free RSS Buddha News Feed 

Japanese Buddhism, Photo Dictionary of Japan's Shinto and Buddhist DivinitiesRETURN TO TOP PAGE of Japanese Buddhist Statuary A to Z Photo Library & Dictionary of Gods, Goddesses, Shinto Kami, Creatures, and Demons
top line
spacer


QUICK START
Home: What's New
Buddha's Teachings
History & Timeline
Historical Buddha
Student's Guide
Teacher's Guide

DEITY GUIDES
Who's Who
Buddha
Bodhisattva
Myo-o
Shinto Kami
Shugendo
Stars & Planets
Tenbu (Deva)

OTHER GUIDES
About Site Author
Bibliography
Buddhism in Japan
Busshi Glossary
Carving Techniques
Cycle of Suffering
Drapery/Robe Guide
Mandala Guide
Mudra Guide
Objects Guide
Pilgrimage Guide
Shinto Guide
Statues by Artist
Statues by Era
Symbols Guide
Terminology

Buddhist-Artwork.com, our sister site, offers online sales of hand-carved wood Buddha statues.
Buddhist-Artwork.com, our sister site, offers online sales of hand-carved wood Buddha statues.

A TO Z INDEX
3 Element Stele
3 Monkeys
4 Bosatsu
4 Celestial Emblems
4 Heavenly Kings
5 (Number Five)
5 Elements
5 Tathagata
5 Tier Pagoda
5 Wisdom Kings
6 Jizo
6 Kannon
6 Realms
6 Nara Schools
7 Lucky Gods
7 Nara Temples
8 Legions
8 Zodiac Patrons
10 Kings of Hell
12 Devas
12 Generals
12 Zodiac Animals
13 Butsu (Funerals)
28 Legions
28 Constellations
30 Buddha of Month
30 Kami of Month
33 Kannon
About the Author
Agyo
Aizen
Amano Jyaku
Amida Nyorai
Apsaras
Arakan (Rakan)
Arhat (Rakan)
Ashuku Nyorai
Asuka Era Art Tour
Asura (Ashura)
Baku (Eats Dreams)
Bamboo
Benzaiten (Benten)
Bibliography
Big Buddha
Birushana Nyorai
Bishamon-ten
Bodhisattva
Bonbori Artwork
Bosatsu Group
Bosatsu of Mercy
Bosatsu on Clouds
Buddha (Historical)
Buddha Group
Buddha Statues
Busshi (Sculptors)
Calligraphy
Celestial Emblems
Celestial Maidens
Children Patrons
Classifying
Color Red
Confucius
Contact Us
Daibutsu
Daijizaiten
Daikokuten
Dainichi Nyorai
Daruma (Zen)
Datsueba (Hell Hag)
Deva (Tenbu)
Donations
Dosojin
Dragon
Drapery (Robes)
Early Buddhism Japan
Ebisu
Eight Legions
En no Gyoja
Estores
Family Tree
Footprints of Buddha
Fox (Inari)
Fudo (Fudou) Myoo
Fugen Bosatsu
Fujin (Wind God)
Fukurokuju
Gakko & Nikko
Gardens
Gigeiten
Godai Nyorai
Goddess of Mercy
Goddesses
Gongen
Gravestones
Hachi Bushu
Hachiman
Hands (Mudra)
Hell (10 Judges)
Hell Hag (Datsueba)
Hell Scrolls
Henge
Hikyu (Lion Beast)
Holy Mountains
Ho-o (Phoenix)
Hotei
Idaten
Inari (Fox)
Ishanaten
Ishidoro (Ishidourou)
Jikokuten
Jizo Bosatsu
Jocho Busshi
Juni Shi
Juni Shinsho
Juni Ten
Junrei (Pilgrimage)
Jurojin
Juuzenji
Jyaki or Tentoki
Kaikei Busshi
Kamakura Buddhism
Kankiten
Kannon Bosatsu
Kappa
Kariteimo (Kishibojin)
Karura
Karyoubinga
Kendatsuba
Kichijouten
Kitchen Gods
Kishibojin (Kariteimo)
Kitsune (Oinari)
Kokuzo Bosatsu
Koujin (Kojin)
Komokuten
Korean Buddhism
Koushin
Lanterns (Stone)
Links
Making Statues
Mandara (Mandala)
Maneki Neko
Marishiten (Marici)
Miroku Bosatsu
Monju Bosatsu
Monkeys
Moon Lodges
Mother Goddess
Mudra (Hands)
Myoken (Pole Star)
Myo-o
Nara Era Art Tour
Newsletter Sign Up
Nijuhachi Bushu
Nikko & Gakko
Ninpinin
Nio Protectors
Nyorai Group
Objects & Symbols
Onigawara
Phoenix (Ho-o)
Pilgrimage Guide
Pottery
Protective Stones
Raigo Triad
Raijin (Thunder God)
Rakan (Arhat)
Red Clothing
Reincarnation
Robes (Drapery)
Rock Gardens
Sanbo Kojin
Sanno Gongen
Sarutahiko
Sculptors (Busshi)
Seishi Bosatsu
Sendan Kendatsuba
Seven Lucky Gods
Shachi, Shachihoko
Shaka Nyorai
Shape Shifters
Shichifukujin
Shijin (Shishin)
Shinra Myoujin
Shinto Clergy
Shinto Concepts
Shinto Kami
Shinto Main Menu
Shinto Sects
Shinto Shrines
Shishi (Lion)
Shitenno
Shoki
Shomen Kongo
Shotoku Taishi
Shrines
Shugendo
Siddhartha
Six States
Star Deities
Stone Gardens
Stone Graves
Stone Lanterns
Stones (Top Menu)
Suijin (Water Kami)
Symbols & Objects
Tamonten
Taishakuten
Tanuki
Temples
Temple Lodging
Tenbu Group
Tengu
Tennin & Tennyo
Tentoki or Jyaki
Terminology
Tibetan Carpets
Tibet Photos
Tibetan Tanka
Transmigration
Ungyo
Unkei Busshi
Videos on Buddhism
Water Basin
Weapons
Wheel of Life
Yakushi Nyorai
Yasha (Yaksha)
Zao Gongen
Zen (Daruma)
Zen Art Tour
Zodiac Calendar
Zochoten

 

spacer

KOREAN KANHWA SŎN BUDDHISM -- SPECIAL REPORT


Top Menu
Introduction


Architecture
maroon-check 25 Photos


Creatures
42 Photos


Deities
59 Photos


Doors
13 Photos


Paintings
64 Photos


People
32 Photos


Votive Icons
21 Photos

Also See
finger pointing 

Korean Influence on Early Japanese Buddhism. Not a systematic study, but rather a "sketch" of the key contributions
of Korean monks, artisans, and specialists to early Japanese Buddhist doctrine, art, and architecture. 30 Photos.

ARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPE IN KOREA. Many of Korea's temples were destroyed over the centuries by fire, natural disaster, and invading Japanese troops. The temples we visited are all important to Korean Seon (Sŏn) practice. Most were rebuild in the late 19th century or later. The temples, palaces, and residences we visited include: Gyeongbokgung Palace (Seoul) Bukchon Village (Seoul), Magoksa Temple, Donghaksa Temple, Gapsa Temple, Bongsama Temple, Chukseosa Temple, Seokjongsa Temple, and others (see map below).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHOTO CREDITS. All photos by Mark Schumacher (unless stated otherwise). Taken during a conference, meditation retreat, and tour related to Kanhwa Sŏn 看話禪 and Hwadu 話頭 meditative techniques (the Korean counterpart of Zen Kōan meditation). The event took place in Korea between June 23 and July 3, 2012. It was organized by the Center for the Study of the Chogye Order (Chonghak Yŏn'guwŏn) at Dongguk University. Participants included advanced graduate students, professors, and independent scholars in Korean Religions and Buddhist Studies. The retreat was held at Magoksa Temple, a few hours south of Seoul. If you would like to submit your own photo(s) for inclusion here (with credits to you), please contact me. If you have a Facebook account, you can also post your photos at the Korea Kanhwa Sŏn Facebook Group Page.

Temple's We Visited and Online Temple Resources

  • Magoksa Temple (K = 마곡사, C = 麻谷寺)
    Magoksa Temple Homepage  ||  Temple Review at KoreaTemple.net
    Magoksa, located in Gongju, South Korea, is the head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. It is here that our group held its meditation retreat between June 23 and July 1.
     
  • Donghaksa Temple (K = 동학사, C = 東鶴寺)
    Temple review by KoreaTemple.net. ||  Temple review by Buddhist-tourism.com
    Largest center of study for female monks in Korea, Donghaksa specializes in Buddhist studies and is part of the Jogye order.
     
  • Gapsa Temple (K = 갑사)
    Gapsa Homepage  ||  Temple review by Koreatemple.net
     
  • Bongamsa Temple. 鳳巖寺. One of the Nine Mountain Schools (禪門九山) of Seon practice in Korea. Here we heard a Dharma talk from Master Jeokmyeong . This temple, says Visitkorea.or.kr, is "open to the public only one day per year. Visit on any day other than Buddha's Birthday and you will be turned away at the gate. A major Korean center for the practice of Seon (better known in the West by its Japanese name of Zen). Bongamsa is one of Korea's oldest centers of Seon meditation. This Seon tradition continues to this day. In 1982, the temple and the surrounding mountain and forests were closed off to the outside world to produce a better meditation environment. Not surprisingly, there's a good deal of competition between monks to enter the monastery, where monks, from the abbot on down, meditate for at least eight hours a day." <end quote>
     
  • Chukseosa Temple 鷲棲寺. Here we heard a Dharma talk from Master Muyeo 無如.
    Temple review by Bonghaw.go.kr  ||  Temple review at KBS.co.kr ||  About temple's Yakushi statue.
     
  • Seokjongsa Temple. Here we heard a Dharma talk from Master Hyeguk.
    See details at Chungbuk Nadri.net.
     
  • Other Temple Resources
     

map-of-temples-2
Location of temples we visited in South Korea

Nine Mountain Schools of Seon (Sŏn) Practice in Korea 禪門九山

Nine Mountain Schools 禪門九山 (C = Chánmén Jiǔshān, K = Seonmun Gusan 선문구산, J = Zenmon Kyūsan). An appellation for the early schools of Korean Seon (Sŏn) practice. Each school was connected with one of nine mountain monasteries. The nine are listed below.

  1. Gaji-san school (迦智山), established at Borimsa (寶林寺) under the influence of Doui (道義; d. 825) and his grand-student Chejing (體澄; 804–890). Doui studied in China under Zhizang (智藏; 735–814) and Baizhang (百丈; 749–814).
  2. Seongju san (聖住山) school, established by Muyeom (無染; 800–888) who received his inga 印可 from Magu Baoche (麻谷寶徹; b. 720?).
  3. Silsang san (實相山) school, founded by Hongcheok (洪陟; fl. 830), who also studied under Zhizang.
  4. Huiyang san (曦陽山) school, founded by Beomnang and Jiseon Doheon (智詵道憲; 824–882), who was taught by a Korean teacher of the Mazu transmission.
  5. Bongnim san (鳳林山) school, established by Wongam Hyeon'uk (圓鑑玄昱; 787–869) and his student Simhui (審希, fl. 9c). Hyeon'uk was a student of Zhangjing Huaihui (章敬懷暉; 748–835).
  6. Dongni san (桐裡山) school, established by Hyecheol (慧徹; 785–861) who was a student of Jizang.
  7. Sagul san (闍崛山) school, established by Beom'il (梵日; 810–889), who studied in China with Yanguan Qian (鹽官齊安; 750?-842) and Yueshan Weiyan (樂山惟嚴).
  8. Saja san (獅子山) school, established by Doyun (道允; 797–868), who studied under Nanjuan puyuan (南泉普願; 748–835).
  9. Sumi-san school (須彌山) founded by Ieom (利嚴; 869–936), which had developed from the Caotong (曹洞) lineage. The term Gusan in Korea also becomes a general rubric for 'all the Seon schools,' holding such connotations down to the present.

    Source: Digital Dictionary of Buddhism (sign in with user name = guest)
    The DDB includes much more information about the nine. A visit is highly recommended.

Jump to Top of Page

spacer
bottom bar

Copyright 1995 - 2013. Mark Schumacher. Email Mark.
All stories and photos, unless specified otherwise, by Schumacher.
www.onmarkproductions.com     |     make a donation

Please do not copy these pages into Wikipedia or elsewhere without proper citation !